Breaking the Myth: “If you build it, will they come?”

Screen Shot 2016-05-18 at 11.12.58 AMWe’re all aware of the Kevin Costner movie Field of Dreams.  The movie is best remembered for the quote “If you build it, he will come.”  Costner’s character, Ray, builds a baseball diamond in the middle of his Iowa cornfield and yes, Shoeless Joe came, along with the rest of the Chicago White Sox team of 1919.  Once the diamond was complete, one by one, the members of the team came walking out of the cornfield, ready to play ball.

Sounds like an awesome concept, right?  If you build a perfectly designed ‘field’ for a specific audience, you will meet their unfilled dreams while providing a sense of connection and achievement for those involved.  Wouldn’t it be great if you could somehow - telepathically or otherwise -  let your audience know you have something for them?  Think of how great it would be if the moment you launched your talent community instantaneously there were 100’s of members already at your fingertips.

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Metrics – don’t be fooled

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Ah recruiting metrics. They can provide such a wealth of information, but they can also fool you by providing unnecessary data. Some find them the necessary evil while others appreciate their value and have built sophisticated processes in order to capture every possible data point to measure their recruiting effectiveness. I, for one, have always loved recruiting metrics. From the time I stepped into corporate recruiting, I was determined to eliminate subjectivity on all fronts. At the end of the day, I was so determined to be prepared to answer that elusive question from my leaders and/or hiring managers: “Why?”. There was no way I would let myself answer with a vague “I don’t know” or “because” response. Instead, I would rifle through any data I could lay my hands on to put together informed and valuable answers. Remember, this was 15-20 years ago when the thought of recruiting efficiency was at it’s infancy and it was acceptable to point the finger at the recruiter for the blame.

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