How Employers Can Support Work/Life Harmony Approach to Careers

We explored the idea of individuals taking a whole-life-fit approach to their careers in our last post, to help them create harmony between their work and life. The concept of finding harmony, rather than balance between the two, outlines that in order to achieve a better quality of life, we must learn to leverage our strengths and abilities from each area of our life to contribute to others. As the individual seeks to find that harmony, employers can put forth their efforts to help employees achieve it. According to the Corporate Executive Board, who represents about 80% of the Fortune 500 companies, who found that employees who believe that they have a good work/life balance work 21% harder than those who don’t. That’s a pretty nice productivity boost.

Employers are offering numerous perks to help their team members find a good work/life balance, but the statistics show that many employees are not satisfied with the efforts. A study by the American Psychological Association reveals that 59% of employees are satisfied by those efforts, with only 53% saying they think that their employer actually values a work/life balance.

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Whole-Life-Fit as a Measure of Work/Life Harmony

People have struggled to find a work/life balance pretty much since the existence of ‘work’. Determining where your priorities lie and how to actually attend to them can be just as stressful as the demands of your work and life. In a society that is increasingly more connected, creating a balance can seem unachieveable. Stepping back from the idea of work/life balance – the ability to juggle all the responsibilities in your life, pay attention to all your priorities, and not jeopardize any of them – and adjusting your view to a work/life harmony gives the opportunity to re-evaluate what your responsibilities and priorities are. Only then can you proactively make decisions that help them work together to provide you with a better quality of life.

When it comes to recruitment, companies go through a relatively thorough process with the goal of finding ‘talent fit.’ This process hopes to seek candidates who are aligned with the values and objectives of the company, and who offer the appropriate skills and experiences needed to perform well in a role. When candidates who fit these criteria are selected for hire, they generally become better engaged employees who tend to outperform those with less of a ‘fit.’

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